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Building A Pole Barn on Fiery Hill Rd. Fort Plain, N.Y.

by Delnero Construction & Remodeling



Building a Pole Barn
Building a Pole Barn
Building a Pole Barn
Building a Pole Barn
Building a Pole Barn
Building a Pole Barn
Building a Pole Barn
Building a Pole Barn
Building a Pole Barn
Building a Pole Barn
Building a Pole Barn
Building a Pole Barn
Four years after moving from Mass. to the Mohawk Valley of New York State, we purchased an old farm house that was in the middle of our property. Soon after moving into this home (1 mile from the showroom and shop) it was apparent we needed add­itional barn space, and planned on building an 85 ft. x 28 ft. pole barn onto a small existing barn.

We built the trusses for the new barn ourselves. Here Justin applies glue before screwing the gusset into place. We designed the trusses, and screwed placement guide boards down creating a large jig to reproduce them quickly and uniformly.

After we screwed the gussets on one side in the shop, we brought them outside and flipped them over. Here, Bob is securing the second set to the opposite side.

Digging 4 ft. deep holes with the backhoe to set the 6" x 6" pressure treated posts into. By digging a hole wider than needed, we are able to set the posts in line much nicer than if we used the post hole digger.

After the 15 posts were set square to each other, we leveled them and secured them with temporary support boards. The next step was to cut the posts so that they were all level with each other at the tops. We do this by using a transit to get a bench mark on each post. Justin sights the post, and Jared draws a line when his speed square matches the transit's cross hairs.

A shot of the posts ready to be cut to height. The next step was to cut a 12" x 2" slot in the top of the posts for the 2" x 12" header to rest on, and to secure to.

Justin & Jared placing the first layer of headers into place.

John & Justin are securing the second layer of header boards into place. They stagger the ends of this layer so they land in the center of the first row, making the header much stronger.

After the headers were in place, we were ready to set the trusses. Here the trusses are all set, and the purloins and fascia boards are also in place. We are now ready for the tin roof. Notice that some of the side boards that will hold the pine board and batten siding have been secured to the posts.

Justin, Steve, and Bobby are screwing the 12" wide pine siding to the side boards.

A shot of the pole barn with the tin roof on, and the siding on all but the gable ends.

Justin finishing up the siding on the gable end. All that was left to do was trim out the corners, and place in the window sash.

We let the barn set a year before painting it. We used "wet" pine for the siding which needed to dry out. If we had painted it right away, there would have been white marks on where the pine boards were behind the battens before they shrunk.

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